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Friday, February 4, 2011

Welcome Paranormal Historical Fiction Author, Keta Diablo As Discusses Her Newest Book "Where the Rain is Made"

Scribal Love Welcomes Keta Diablo



Hi Clare, and thanks so much for having me as a guest. 


When did you know you wanted to write books and when did you actually start?


I didn't really aspire to be a writer for years like some have. I've been writing professionally for about five years. I think it's the greatest job in the world and wish I'd started earlier. I have, however, always been very interested in books and have read tons during my life. 


Where did the idea for your book, "Where the Rain Is Made," come from?


There's usually a story behind the books we write, and there's also one behind Where the Rain Is Made.  I think that's why this one is the book of my heart.


When my youngest son, Dylan, was twelve, he developed a sudden and voracious interest in history, specifically American West history. We spent hours at the library poring through books, and believe me, our arms were full when we left.


His focus eventually centered on the Native American tribes. For some reason, the legend and lore surrounding their fascinating, yet often tragic lives, held his interest for hours on end. I remember the day I first heard the word Dog Soldier from his lips. I recalled watching a Tom Berenger movie once featuring the legendary warriors of the Cheyenne Nation, but by the time my son finished educating me, I knew who Black Kettle's second cousin was three times removed. I'm kidding, of course.


Like Dylan, I immersed myself in the books, and found it difficult to stop thinking about the Dog Soldiers -- the most revered and feared tribe of the plains. The history books paint them as fearless fighters who often staked themselves to the ground with a long rope during battle. This symbolized a sign of no retreat.    


Like most Native American tribes of the time, their ending was indeed tragic, but I like to remember all the mystical wonder of the Cheyenne, particularly the Dog Soldiers. 


I hope you enjoy reading about Meko and Cesca as much as I loved writing about them. Where The Rain Is Made represents a wonderful time in my life.  What could be better than sharing stories and knowledge with your children?


So here's to you, Dylan, and to you, readers. May you come to love the mystery and magic in life that keeps us all searching for that next wonderful read. 


Where The Rain Is Made has been nominated for Best e-novel of the year (2010). How does it feel when your work is recognized in such a way?


Wonderful! I was very surprised. I found out through a Google alert and had no idea anyone from Authors After Dark (a great organization) knew anything about me or my books. I feel very honored.


Your new book is soon to be published. How nervous does that make you?


I don't get nervous anymore. I try to write the best possible book I can write and the rest is up to the readers and reviewers. You never know what someone will think of your book. I've received twenty five-star reviews for Where The Rain Is Made from all over the Internet. Most of the people who reviewed I don't know. But there was one review from a man. He said he couldn't get in to the book and gave it a DNF (did not finish). As authors, we have to take the bad with the good and mostly clamp our lips together. Everyone's taste is different and people have very strong opinions about their reading material.


Were you yourself a fan of the paranormal genre when you grew up or did it come to you while writing?


I have always loved the paranormal. When I was three years old we lived in a very old house. At night I cried and wanted my mom to sit with me until I fell asleep. I kept telling her about the men who lived up by ceiling in my room and couldn’t understand why she didn't see them. Mom still talks about that today. I think children and animals see ghosts because they don't know what they are. To them, they’re just people. I don't recall much from that age, but I recall seeing the little people in my room. And . . . I was terrified.


How do you approach writing?


My writing schedule varies. In fact, we could say, 'what writing schedule'? I do most of my writing late afternoon until late night. I am not a morning person so I don't write before noon. I don't have outlines, note cards or sticky notes to refer to. I do, however, plan the book in my head for weeks, sometimes months. I go over every conversation, know what my hero and heroine likes, wears and talks before I start writing. I've tried the other methods of making an outline, and I feel this really crimps creativity. I like to write from my head not from notes. And sometimes I don't know where the story will take me. They have been known to veer off the plan in my head. 


You have written a number of books. Do you have a favorite?


I have to say Where the Rain Is Made (see above), The book has done quite well in the market. Authors are partial to all their books; some even think of them as their babies or children. It's very hard to choose favorites when you put so much time and angst into every book. I hear many people say, 'I'm going to write a book,' and I say under my breath, "Good luck with that." Writing is hard, very hard. Don't let anyone tell you it's a matter of just sitting down and putting words on paper. There is so much more to it than that. 


 What was your favorite book growing up? 


Oh, good, an easy question. I love To Kill A Mockingbird and still do. I read it at least once a year. The first time I read TKAM I was in 5th grade. A teacher placed a copy and my desk and said, "Keta, read this book. I think you'll love it." Several days passed before I picked up the book, but then I couldn't put it down. TKAM opened an entire world for me. I could feel the sultry heat of that town, taste the horrid prejudice. I fell in love with Gem and Scout and realized for the first time I could go anywhere in the world with books. I haven't stopped reading. My only regret: I wish I had more time to read. There are so many wonderful writers and books out there calling to me, but time is my biggest enemy. 


Thanks so much again for hosting me. I loved your questions and really enjoyed my time with you,


Namaste, Keta Diablo


You can find Keta on the Net here:


Keta's Keep Romance Blog, http://ketaskeep.blogspot.com


Keta's Haunt Author Home: http://www.ketadiablo.com


Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ketadiablo


Facebook Fan page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Keta-Diablo/88641942024?v=wall


Keta’s next paranormal/historical Sojourn With A Stranger, will be released in March. 


You can read several chapters here at: 


http://freefantasticalfiction.blogspot.com/





Blurb for "Where The Rain Is Made"


After a decadent-looking savage captures her and her brother, Francesca DuVall spends every waking moment planning an escape for Marsh. She never counted on the powerful draw of desire interfering with her scheme in the camp of the brutal Cheyenne dog soldiers.


Ethan Gray is a curator at a national museum . . . most of the time, but when he travels through time to help his beloved People he’s Meko, the leader of the most revered and feared tribes of the plains. 


Although their worlds are decades apart  Meko can’t resist the dark beauty he kidnaps during a raid. He has many battles to fight, but none he wants to win more than the one that will capture Cesca’s heart forever.







Watch the video trailer for Where The Rain Is Made:





6 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for hosting me. Sorry I'm late for the party. I was out of town this morning.

    You have a lovely site, and I'll be back often.

    Have a wonderful weekend The Embraced Scribal Love.

    Keta,
    http://www.ketadiablo.com

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  2. Keta, you never cease to amaze me girl, you are as always an inspiration. I want to be YOU when I grow up!

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  3. I can't wait to read it, Keta! Awesome post. And the book trailer is well done. All the best :D

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  4. Hi Keta! I enjoyed the interview. Congrats on your release.

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  5. Good interview. I like history also and while I know the basics I find that historical fiction fleshes out the story and people behind the history. Where the Rain is Made sounds good.

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  6. Awesome interview and the bk looks great! Much continued success Keta!

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